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Archive for the ‘federal recognition’ Category

This is one of 9 videos of Lumbee attorney Arlinda Locklear, in her public talk at UNC-Chapel Hill on April 28, 2010. It provides a thorough and accurate view from an national expert in Indian law on the status and import of Lumbee federal recognition.

Arlinda Locklear on Lumbee Federal Recognition

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On July 15, 2010, UNC-TV’s North Carolina Now program aired a thorough and accurate story on Lumbee recognition. Reporter Rob Holliday interviewed me along with Professor Mary Ann Jacobs (UNC-Pembroke), Professor Walt Wolfram (N.C. State), Tribal Chairman Purnell Swett, and others. You can view the story here.

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This article was written by D.G. Martin, host of UNC-TV’s North Carolina Bookwatch and Who’s Talking on 1360 WCHL Radio. It appeared in the Thomasville Times on May 4, 2010.

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Are you trying to make sense out of the latest news from the Lumbee Tribe?

According to news reports, the Lumbee Tribal Council has approved a contract with a Nevada-based lobbying firm that will attempt to persuade Congress to grant the tribe full recognition without any restrictions on gambling ventures.

A bill granting recognition but restricting gambling has passed the House of Representatives and has been waiting on action by the Senate.

The shocker in the new contract with Lewin International is a provision that would require the (more…)

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In a letter circulated at the Lumbee powwow this past weekend, members of the Tribal Council announced a meeting for tribal members to clear up what they called “misinformation” in the “non-tribal press” about the contract that was recently signed with Lewin International, LLC, to promote the tribe’s federal recognition bill currently before Congress. This was the first official communication from the Council about its recent decision. The meeting will take place this Friday, May 7, at the Givens Performing Arts Center at UNC-Pembroke, starting at 6:30 pm. A copy of the Council’s letter is below, followed by a response I sent to my tribal council representatives this morning.

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I am very grateful that “Who’s Talking with DG Martin” on WCHL 1030 AM Radio is playing an interview on LUMBEE INDIANS IN THE JIM CROW SOUTH Wednesday 4/28 at 6 pm and 10 pm. Topics covered include Lumbee Recognition, race, and much more! Get the download after the show at http://www.1360wchl.com/listenwide.html?showname=dgpodcast

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I’m very pleased and honored to be a guest blogger for First Peoples Publishing Initiative! Today they’ve posted reflections and reporting on the Lumbee tribal council’s recent shift in their federal recognition strategy. There are many parallels with the past…and as William Faulkner may have said, “the past is not dead, it’s not even past.”

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Paying attention to Indian Country? Then by now you should have heard of Elouise Cobell.

In 1996 Cobell filed a class-action lawsuit against the Department of the Interior and the Department of the Treasury, now known as Cobell v. Salazar. The case became the most important litigation ever to occur between American Indians and the United States. Cobell, a citizen of the Blackfeet Nation, filed the suit on behalf of nearly 400,000 other American Indians. She and her co-plaintiffs alleged the mismanagement of leased lands held in trust for individual Indians by the federal government.

These trust accounts began in 1887, when Congress started to divide Indian lands among citizens of tribal nations and then sell off the remaining tribal land to American citizens, a policy known as allotment. The federal government then managed the land that remained in Indian hands on behalf of those Indians and their beneficiaries. Often the government leased this land at below-market rates to mining, oil, gas, livestock, and timber companies.

Cobell alleged that the government failed to keep adequate account records and that it destroyed records, used the income from leasing for other purposes, and simply failed to pay Indians and their beneficiaries the amounts they were owed under the trust relationship. On December 8, 2009, the Department of the Interior announced that it and the plaintiffs had reached a settlement for $3.4 billion. But in the past the Cobell plaintiffs have claimed that the government owes them more than $120 billion to account for funds lost, mismanaged, or not paid.

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